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2 edition of Effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental grassland ecosystems found in the catalog.

Effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental grassland ecosystems

Rachel J Collins

Effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental grassland ecosystems

by Rachel J Collins

  • 345 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Microtus pennsylvanicus -- Habitat,
  • Zoology

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Rachel J. Collins
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 57 leaves :
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14971099M

    of the meadow vole, and that this species appears to be an edge-tolerant species. Key words: Microtus pennsylvanicus, dispersal, edge effects, habitat fragmentation, mead-ow vole, patch shape, population ecology Human activities have led to extensive habitat fragmentation and, consequently, patches of natural habitat have become. habitat fragmentation using two species with different space-use requirements - the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus, (mean body mass approx. 42 g), which has relatively small home ranges, and the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus (22 g), with home ranges about four times larger.

    Progress 10/01/06 to 09/30/07 Outputs OUTPUTS: To understand better the influence of behavior on species responses to habitat loss and fragmentation, we conducted a small-scale experiment with radio-collared meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus). Our objective was to quantify the effects of matrix habitat on movement behavior of voles. The experiment was designed to investigate the joint effect of predation, fragmentation and breeding season on vole population dynamics. To this end 36 scenarios were designed comprising all possible combinations of three types of predator assembly, four levels of landscape fragmentation, and three durations of breeding season.

    it has two inherent weaknesses. First, because habitat fragmentation is a landscape- scale process (McGarigal & Cushman ), the sample size in such studies, for questions about the effects of habitat fragmentation on biodiversity, is typically 1 2 3 time Figure 1 The process of habitat fragmentation, where "a large expanse of habitat is. In attempting to quantify the effects of habitat fragmentation on avian species, there is consid- erable confusion as to what habitat fragmenta- tion is, how it relates to natural and anthropo- meadow and old forest in Fig. lb). In the ex- ample shown in Figure lb, a combination of old forest and meadow are needed to provide the.


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Effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental grassland ecosystems by Rachel J Collins Download PDF EPUB FB2

This study examined the effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental landscape patches.

The study was conducted from May–November at the Miami University Ecology Research Center. Eight ha small mammal enclosures were used. Four enclosures contained a m2 nonfragmented patch and four.

This study examined the effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental landscape patches. The study was conducted from May–November at the Miami University Ecology Research Center.

Eight ha small mammal enclosures were used. Four enclosures contained a m2 nonfragmented patch and four Cited by: HABITAT LOSS AND FRAGMENTATION * Fahrig J.

Wildl. Manage. 61(3) A. B1 y 1 Habitat Loss Habitat Loss and Fragmentation Fig. Effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on patch size and isolation. If habitat loss results in a constant number of smaller patches, then patch size effects are due to habitat loss alone.

The effects of fragmentation on biodiversity depend on specific species traits and characteristics of the fragments and the surrounding matrix (Ewers and Didham, ; Fahrig, ; Henle et al., ).At least four effects form the basis of most quantitative measures of habitat fragmentation (Fahrig, ): (a) reduction in habitat amount, (b) increase in the number of fragments, (c) decrease.

Collins RJ, Barrett GW () Effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) population dynamics in experimental landscape patches. Landsc Ecol –76 CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 3. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): This study examined the effects of habitat fragmentation on meadow vole (Microtuspennsylvanicus) popula- tion dynamics in experimental landscape patches.

The study was conducted from May-November at the Miami University Ecology Research Center. Eight ha small mammal enclosures were used. Numerous studies have used voles in experimental systems exploring the effects of habitat fragmentation on dispersal, population genetics, movement distances, switching rates between habitats, space use, and demographics (Aars et al.

; Aars and Ims ; Andreassen et al. ; Coffman et al. ; Diffendorfer et al. ; Lin and Batzli. We studied the effects of habitat fragmentation on the movements of cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), and prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) living in a.

Emigration from one habitat patch to another has a large effect on population and metapopulation dynamics. One factor that affects emigration is permeability of patch edges. This study looks at the effects of edge shape (convex, concave, and straight) on edge permeability for meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus).

Shape of patch edges affects edge permeability for meadow voles V Conservation biologists should consider edge shapes when exploring the effects of habitat fragmentation on animal populations. Also other experiments probing the effects of habitat fragmentation and destruction on vole populations have failed to find population level effects on vital rates (e.g.

Harper, Bollinger & Barrett ; Johannesen & Ims ; Wolff, Schrauber & Edge ). 1. We used a factorial experimental design to test whether habitat fragmentation (two different fragment sizes) and connectivity (presence and absence of corridors between small fragments) affected population growth rate and two conventional measures of the demographic structure (proportion of reproductive adults and sex ratio) in 12 enclosed populations of root voles.

Effects of habitat fragmentation and human disturbance on the population dynamics of the Yunnan snub-nosed monkey from to Xumao Zhao1,2, Baoping Ren1, Dayong Li3, Zuofu Xiang4, Paul A. Garber5 and Ming Li1,6 1CASKeyLaboratory ofAnimal Ecology andConservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

In a recent review of the effects of habitat fragmentation on faunal diversity, Fahrig () found that (i) the amount of habitat remaining in a landscape was a better predictor of biodiversity than was habitat fragmentation per se (=the breaking apart of habitat), and (ii) habitat fragmentation per se often resulted in increased rather than.

Habitat fragmentation describes the emergence of discontinuities (fragmentation) in an organism's preferred environment (), causing population fragmentation and ecosystem of habitat fragmentation include geological processes that slowly alter the layout of the physical environment (suspected of being one of the major causes of speciation), and human activity such as land.

reproduction, and dispersal of voles following loss and fragmentation of habitat. Lastly, we address the con-cerns of Wiens et al. () and Lima and Zollner () by applying evolutionary theory to the behavioral ecol-ogy of vole responses to habitat loss and fragmentation.

We tested the random sample hypothesis that the so. The Minister of the Environment is the competent minister under SARA for the Woodland Vole and has prepared this management plan as per section 65 of SARA. To the extent possible it has been prepared in cooperation with the provinces of Ontario (Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) and Quebec (Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs du Québec).

The effects of habitat manipulation on population distribution and foraging behavior in meadow voles. Oikos Conservation strategy—the effects of fragmentation on extinction. Nat.

Winterhalder, B. Opportunity-cost foraging models for stationary and mobile predators. Nat. Habitat loss and degradation that comes as a result of human activity is the single biggest threat to biodiversity in the world today.

Habitat Fragmentation and Landscape Change is a groundbreaking work that brings together a wealth of information from a wide range of sources to define the ecological problems caused by landscape change and to highlight the relationships among landscape change 4/5(2). Dispersal Distance: In Pennsylvania three subadult meadow voles were captured at least miles ( km) from the nearest appreciable suitable meadow vole habitat, suggesting that meadow voles are adapted to long-distance dispersal.

Habitat Patch Shape: In Ohio the effects of patch shape and proportion of edge were investigated by mowing. The literature on effects of habitat fragmentation on biodiversity is huge.

It is also very diverse, with different authors measuring fragmentation in different ways and, as a consequence, drawing different conclusions regarding both the magnitude and direction of its effects. Habitat fragmentation is usually defined as a landscape-scale process involving both habitat loss and the breaking.Meadow voles have a home range size relative to their sex.

Males have a much larger home range than females. The home ranges of males are m^2 while the home ranges of females are m^2. Female meadow voles are territorial of only about 38 m^2 of their home ranges. (Elbroch and Rinehart, ; Naughton, ) Communication and.The meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus), sometimes called the field mouse or meadow mouse, is a North American vole found across Canada, Alaska and the northern United range extends farther south along the Atlantic coast.

One subspecies, the Florida salt marsh vole (M. p. dukecampbelli), is found in Florida, and is classified as endangered.